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Nevada Wild Horse & Burro Areas

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BLM-Managed Wild Horse & Burro Herd Management Areas:
Arizona  California  Colorado  Idaho  Montana  Nevada  New Mexico  Oregon  Utah
BLM Holding & Adoption Centers Long-Term Holding Facilities 

NEVADA HERD MANAGEMENT AREAS

NEVADA BLM DISTRICTS:  (click for herd areas within any district)

The majority of Wild Horses Live in Nevada. Lots of burros, too.
NEVADA WILD HORSE & BURRO HERD MANAGEMENT AREAS

Click to enlarge map: BLM.gov
or click HERE  for new BLM map

HISTORY OF NEVADA WILD HORSES

Spaniards brought horses with them to the Southwest the 16th and 17th centuries. But it wasn't until settlement began in the 1800's that wild horse herds began to develop in this area to any great extent. Most were brought there by ranchers, who allowed them to roam the range at will, since there was plenty of room and the treeless, rocky landscape was hard to fence. Ranchers would periodically go round the horses up and capture the ones they wanted to train for ranch work, or for sale to others. Many ranchers imported large herds of Spanish horses from Mexican breeding farms set up by the Spanish Colonials. People also brought with them or imported from Europe, individuals of breeds they liked, including Morgans, Thoroughbreds, gaited saddle breeds, and drafts. Cavalry Remount breeding operations thrived during the 1800's into the mid-1900's, and those not sent to battle contribute to the larger size found in some Nevada herds, such as Black Rock East & West. The Cavalry Remount ranchers took advantage of the local wild herds (usually the small, athletic Spanish types, who descended from Mexican breeding farms. They were cheap and very hardy) and introduced their own choice of larger stallions.

Prior to the passing of the Wild Free-Roaming Horse and Burro Act of 1971, it was common practice for local ranchers to manage the wild horses in their areas, periodically releasing studs with “good blood” to “upgrade” the herds. Such wild-born stock was the basis of most ranching horses, what we now call "cow ponies." Wild herds also contributed to the development of modern breeds, most notably the Quarter Horse, but also others, including the Rocky Mountain Horse (which was developed in Kentucky from a wild stallion brought in from the Great Basin).

These particular Old-Time Nevada ranchers made very notable contributions to the character and quality of wild herds in various places in Nevada:

"The Dixon Strain"

Tom Dixon was a rancher who came from Ireland to California and then to Nevada in 1869. He raised Shires, Percherons, Morgans, Hambletonians, and various Irish stock. ("Hambletonians" is not a term we hear much today, but they were popular in the 1800's and were the foundation bloodline for the Standardbred breed of today). Dixon ran his  horses from Long Valley to Fish Creek, Spring, Diamond, and Monitor Valleys, and his herds numbered over 10,000.

Tom Dixon is also credited with brining curly mustangs into West-Central Nevada.

"Clifford “Steeldusts”

Yet another source of today's wild herds were the Clifford “Steeldusts.” “Steeldust” was a common name referring to a preferred type of cow pony. These horses were descendants of Steel Dust, a Kentucky bred stud born in 1843.

Steel Dust was of Thoroughbred lineage, but an excellent sprinter. He was a blood bay who stood 15 hands high and weighed 1200 lbs. He was moved to Texas and became a popular sire for ranch stock. Many ranchers would breed wild mares of Spanish decent to Steel Dust, and the result was a much desired cow horse.

Horses of Steel Dust lineage became commonly known as “Steeldusts,” and these horses later became known as Quarter Horses.

The Damele Family and the Curly horses:

Wild horses with curly coats were seen around Eureka, Nevada, from its earliest days in the 1860's. A family of italian immigrants, the Dameles, settled in the Eureka area around the turn of the Century. Beginning in the 1930's, the Damele brothers began breeding curly mustangs brought in from the wild. They are considered the founders of the Curly breed.

The Jackson Family of the Calico Mountains Region:

Wild horses were managed as part of the Jackson family's operations in Northwest Nevada above Gerlach, NV, up until the passing of the 1971 Act. The Jacksons loved color, and were especially fond of the Frame OVero pinto pattern. They introduced colorful mares into the local wild herds, and the Calico Mountains, and its neighbor, the Granite Range, are two of the most colorful wild herds today.

 

USFS Wild Horse & Burro Territories: (Most co-managed by BLM)

Click here for Nevada BLM'S "MUSTANG COUNTRY" booklet - chock full of info for mustang buffs, including wild horse history, visitor tips and camping info. It takes a while to download but is well worth the wait!

Some HMA's are located in part or entireity within Nevada but administered by California:

These HMA's lie partly or entirely within Nevada but are administered by California

  • Carter Reservoir
  • Massacre Lakes
  • Bitner
  • Nut Mountain
  • Wall Canyon
  • High Rock
  • Fox Hog
  • Buckhorn (spans CA & NV borders )
  • Coppersmith (spans CA & NV borders )
  • Twin Peaks (spans CA & NV borders )

GATHER REPORTS:
Completed past gather reports for all Nevada BLM Wild Horse or Burro gathers may be obtained by clicking HERE

The BLM website is a wealth of information. If you read something in the email or Facebook that seems sensational, it's always good to go to the BLM website to check the stats and get their explanation.

BLM FIELD OFFICES


Click on a district on the map to go to a page for that district
Nevada has over 100 HMA's, and also it has more wild horses than all the other states combined. Because of their sheer numbers, Nevada HMA's have not been studied to the extent that they have in some of the other states. Nevada horses are no less unique and wonderful, however. And there ARE identifiable herd characteristics.

There are so many Nevada HMA's that they cry out for organization. Here are a few ways. Choose whichever one makes sense to you:

Nevada Herd Management Areas,
in Alphabetical Order:

AMARGOSA VALLEY (NV511)
ANTELOPE (NV401)
ANTELOPE VALLEY (NV107)
APPLEWHITE (NV518)
ASH MEADOWS (NV509)
AUGUSTA MOUNTAINS (NV311)
BALD MOUNTAIN (NV603)
BLACK ROCK RANGE EAST  (NV209)
BLACK ROCK RANGE WEST (NV227)

BLUE NOSE PEAK (NV514)
BLUE DIAMOND (NV505)
BLUE WING MOUNTAINS (NV217)
BUCK and BALD (NV403)
BUFFALO HILLS (NV220)
BULLFROG (NV629)
BUTTE (NV407)
CALICO MOUNTAINS (NV222)
   Calico Mountains Photos in the Wild
   Calico Mountains Complex
CALLAGHAN (NV604)
CHERRY CREEK (NV406)
CLAN ALPINE (NV310)
CLOVER CREEK (NV517)
CLOVER MOUNTAINS (NV516)
DEER LODGE CANYON (NV521)
DELAMAR (NV515)
DESATOYA (NV606)
DIAMOND (NV609)
DIAMOND HILLS NORTH (NV104)
DIAMOND HILLS SOUTH (NV412)
DOGSKIN MOUNTAINS (NV302)
DRY LAKE (NV410)
ELDORADO MOUNTAINS (NV501)
FISH CREEK (NV612)

FISH LAKE VALLEY (NV622)
FLANIGAN (NV301)
FOX-LAKE RANGE (NV228)
GARFIELD FLAT (NV313)

GOLD BUTTE (NV502)
GOLD MOUNTAIN (NV628)
GOLDFIELD (NV626)
GOSHUTE (NV108)
GRANITE PEAK (NV303)
GRANITE RANGE (NV221)
HICKSON SUMMIT (NV610) (BURRO TERRITORY)
HIGHLAND PEAK (NV522)
HORSE MOUNTAIN (NV308)
HOT CREEK (NV616)
JACKSON MOUNTAINS (NV208)
JAKES WASH (NV408)
JOHNNIE (NV510)
KAMMA MOUNTAINS (NV214)
LAHONTAN (NV306)
LAVA BEDS (NV215)
LITTLE FISH LAKE (NV614)
LITTLE HUMBOLDT (NV102)
LITTLE MOUNTAIN (NV519)
LITTLE OWYHEE (NV200)
MARIETTA (NV316)
MAVERICK-MEDICINE  (NV105)
MCGEE MOUNTAIN (NV210)
MEADOW VALLEY MTNS (NV513)
MILLER FLAT (NV520)
MONTE CRISTO (NV402)
MONTEZUMA PEAK (NV625)
MONTGOMERY PASS (NV317)
MORIAH (NV413)
MORMON MOUNTAINS (NV512)
MUDDY MOUNTAINS (NV503)
NEVADA WILD HORSE RANGE (NV524 - mainly located on Nellis AFB)
NEW PASS-RAVENSWOOD (NV602)
NIGHTINGALE MOUNTAINS (NV219)
NORTH MONITOR (NV611)
NORTH STILLWATER (NV229)
OWYHEE (NV101)
PALMETTO (NV624)
PAYMASTER-LONE MTN (NV621)
PILOT MOUNTAIN (NV314)
PINENUT MOUNTAINS (NV305)
POTOSI NV506
RATTLESNAKE (NV523)
RED ROCKS (NV504)
REVEILLE (NV619)

ROBERTS MOUNTAIN (NV607)
ROCK CREEK (NV103)
ROCKY HILLS (NV605)
SAND SPRINGS EAST (NV405)
SAND SPRINGS WEST (NV630)
SAULSBURY
(NV620)
SEAMAN (NV411)
SEVEN MILE (NV613)
SEVEN TROUGHS (NV216)
SHAWAVE MOUNTAINS (NV218)

SILVER PEAK (NV623)
SNOWSTORM MTNS (NV201)
SOUTH SHOSHONE (NV601)
SOUTH STILLWATER (NV309)
SPRUCE-PEQUOP (NV109)
STONE CABIN (NV618)

STONEWALL (NV627)
TOBIN RANGE (NV231)
WARM SPRINGS CANYON (NV226)
WASSUK (NV312)
WHEELER PASS (NV507)
WHISTLER MOUNTAIN (NV608)
WHITE RIVER (NV409) (USFS)
WILSON CREEK (NV404)
BLM Data for each HMA:

Herd Areas identified in 1971 as part of the Wild Horse & Burro Protection Act but no longer managed for wild horses or burros:


data from http://www.wildhorseandburro.blm.gov/statistics/2005/index.htm

Choose from:
BLM-Managed Wild Horse & Burro Herd Management Areas:
Arizona  California  Colorado  Idaho  Montana  Nevada  New Mexico  Oregon  Utah
BLM Holding & Adoption Centers Long-Term Holding Facilities

Non-BLM Wild Horse Areas:
Atlantic Coast  Central USA 
State of Nevada Dept. of Agriculture (Reno-Area Comstock/Virginia Range "Estrays")
US Forest Service Wild Horse Territories  Sheldon USFWS 

Wild Horse Areas not included in this website: Indian Reservations, Private Lands