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New Mexico

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BLM-Managed Wild Horse & Burro Herd Management Areas:
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BLM Holding & Adoption Centers Long-Term Holding Facilities  Back to Gallery

Learning about the specific herd management area where one's own horse or burro is from can enrich your appreciation for your adopted animal. It is in that spirit that these pages are offered. Do understand, however, that HMAs (Herd Management Areas) are not breeds. A horse or burro from one HMA has far more in common with all others from all other HMAs than it has differences. Within any particular HMA one will find variation in size, body type.

If you wish to know more about your horse or burro's ancestry, please also read the HISTORY section.

NEW MEXICO WILD HORSES & BURROS

Click to see enlarged New Mexico Map


Michele Moore of Garden Valley, CA, and her barrel-racing New Mexico Mustang, Cruise. Cruise was born in the wild on private land in New Mexico.


Valeroso, Spanish Colonial-type mustang adopted by Carmon Deyo & Mike Dibble. Valeroso was gathered off USFS land near Placitas, New Mexico.

 

New Mexico has only two BLM Herd Management areas.

Originally there were two more, but these have been zeroed out. New Mexico has many wild horses, but most are not managed by the BLM. Instead they are either on US Forest Service, US Department of Agriculture, Indian Reservations, or private lands.

data from http://www.wildhorseandburro.blm.gov/statistics/2005/index.htm

Click here to learn how to adopt a New Mexico wild horse from the US Department of Agriculture

There are several USFS Wild Horse Territories in New Mexico:

There are Three USFS Wild Burro Territories:

  • Double A
  • Dome (Bandelier)
  • Saguaro
Patricia Barlow-Irick works with wild horses captured by the US Forest Service and Navajo Nation. She halter trains them and works to help them get adopted. Here are a few, some shown with their new adopters:

Chaco (Navajo Nation horse)

Chaco (Navajo Nation horse)

Jicarillo herd

El Rito herd


Karen R of Missouri adopted these two buckskin/dun mustangs from near Socorro, New Mexico

There are 9 National Wild Horse Territories in New Mexico:

Wild Horse Territory Name                                                      Forest 

Heber                                                                                      Apache/Sitgreaves (01)
Jicarilla                                                                                     Carson (02)
Mesa Las Viejas                                                                      Carson (02)
Mesa Montosa                                                                         Carson (02)
Jarita Mesa                                                                              Carson (02)
Deep Creek                                                                             Gila (06)
San Diego
                                                      Santa Fe (10)
Caja del Rio                                                                             Santa Fe (10)
Chicoma                                                                                   Santa Fe (10) 

Wild Burro Territory Name                                                       Forest
Double A                                                                                 Kaibab (07)
Dome (Bandelier)                                                                     Santa Fe (10)
Saguaro                                                                                    Tonto (12)

The Gila and White Sands wild horses were moved from New Mexico to a private sanctuary on an Indian Reservation in South Dakota that is overseen by Karen Sussman and the International Society for the Protection of Mustangs and Burros. In autumn of 2016, the Dewey County Sheriff's Office took custody of the animals, after it was disvcovered that they had reproduced to 850 animals and were starving to death.

Gila Bend Herd in South Dakota - photos courtesy of Johnnie Forquer

White Sands herd now living in South Dakota - photos courtesy of Johnnie Forquer


Navajo Reservation mustang

"Sir Prize" - Navajo Reservation mustang rescued by Monica Vasey

Wilbur-Cruce mustang

Valeroso, Spanish Colonial-type mustang adopted by Carmon Deyo & Mike Dibble. Valeroso was gathered off USFS land near Placitas, New Mexico.
Heidi Snell
Visual Escapes
Belen, NM

Has an extensive selection of photos she has taken of mustang wild herds near Socorro, New Mexico
http://www.visual-escapes.smugmug.com:80/Animals
 

Brittany Mullins of Mississippi adopted this New Mexico mustang:


Cochese


Carson National Forest horse

Dr. Patricia Barlow-Irick and a Jicarillo mustangs in training
 
 
   

More Info:

1. Jarita Mesa Wild Horse Territory:
      Acres in Territory = 54,866
      Forest = Carson
      Wild horses now in Territory = Yes
      Desired population = 20 to 70 horses as determined by 2002
      Environmental assessment.
      Current population = 80 to 100 horses.
      Grazing allotments that overlap Territory = Jarita Mesa Allotment
            Acres in Jarita Mesa Allotment = 63,673
            Permitted Cattle on Allotment = 2,362 Head Months
            Date Allotment Management Plan Approved = 4/23/2001
            Year next NEPA analysis is planned = 2006
 
2. Jicarilla Wild Horse Territory:
      Acres in Territory = 75,000
      Forest = Carson
      Wild horses now in Territory = Yes
      Desired population = 80 horses.
      Current population = 200 horses. (based on aerial count and
      estimates).
      Grazing allotment that overlaps Territory = Bancos Allotment
            Acres in Bancos Allotment = 16,528
            Permitted Cattle on Allotment =  444 Head Months
            Year next NEPA analysis is planned = 2004
      Grazing allotment that overlaps Territory = Cabresto Allotment
            Acres in Cabresto Allotment = 26,906
            Permitted Cattle on Allotment =  508 Head Months
            Year next NEPA analysis is planned = 2004
      Grazing allotment that overlaps Territory = Carracas Allotment
            Acres in Carracas Allotment = 32,553
            Permitted Cattle on Allotment =   40 Head Months
            Year next NEPA analysis is planned = 2006
      TOTALS for 3 Grazing allotments that overlaps Territory = Bancos 
            + Cabresto + Carracas
            Total Acres  = 75,987
            Permitted Cattle on 3 Allotments =   992 Head Months
 
3. Yeso Montosa Wild Horse Territory:
      Acres in Territory = 4,000
      Forest = Carson
      Wild horses now in Territory = No
      Desired population = 0 horses.
      Current population =  0 horses.
      Grazing allotment that overlaps Territory = Canjilon Allotment
            Acres in Canjilon Allotment = 28,344
            Permitted Cattle on Allotment =  2,901 Head Months
            Date Allotment Management Plan Approved = 3/10/1999
            Date Allotment NEPA Approved = 3/10/1999
      Grazing allotment that overlaps Territory = Mogote Allotment
            Acres in Mogote Allotment = 16,596
            Permitted Cattle on Allotment =  2,409 Head Months
            Date Allotment Management Plan Approved = 1/7/2000
            Date Allotment NEPA Approved = 12/30/1999
      TOTALS for 2 Grazing allotments that overlap Territory = Canjilon 
            + Mogote
            Total Acres  = 44,940
            Permitted Cattle on 3 Allotments =   5,310 Head Months
 
4. Caja Wild Horse Territory:
      Acres in Territory = 14,380
      Forest = Santa Fe
      Wild horses now in Territory = Yes
      Desired population = 48 horses as determined by 1986 
       environmental assessment.
      Current population = 48 horses (estimated).
      Grazing allotments that overlap Territory = Caja del Rio
            Acres in Caja del Rio Allotment = 66,353
            Permitted Cattle on Allotment = 8,297 Head Months
            Year next NEPA analysis is planned = 2006
 
5. Dome Wild Burro Territory:
      Acres in Territory = 3,402
      Forest = Santa Fe
      Wild burros now in Territory = No
      Desired population = 0 burros.
      Current population =  0 burros.
      Grazing allotments that overlap Territory = None
from http://www.whoanm.org/HorseTerritoriesProject/Wild_Horse_Territories_List.htm 

 

Choose from:
BLM-Managed Wild Horse & Burro Herd Management Areas:
Arizona  California  Colorado  Idaho  Montana  Nevada  New Mexico  Oregon  Utah
BLM Holding & Adoption Centers
Long-Term Holding Facilities

Non-BLM Wild Horse Areas:
Atlantic Coast  Central USA 
State of Nevada Dept. of Agriculture (Reno-Area Comstock/Virginia Range "Estrays")
US Forest Service Wild Horse Territories  Sheldon USFWS 

Wild Horse Areas not included in this website: Indian Reservations, Private Lands