Brindle is an extremely rare color pattern in horses, and is not yet understood genetically.

It consists of irregular "drippy" stripes extending vertically over the horse's body, as well as horizontally around the legs. Brindle horses also have a dorsal stripe.
 

Salsa, a brindle mare owned by Brenda Charpilloz - as an adult (above) and a foal (below left)

According to Dr. Philip Sponenberg, BRINDLE is a unique gene that acts by REORGANIZING the COUNTER-SHADING caused by the SOOTY GENE into brindle strips.

Because the striping patterns are similar to dun, it is sometimes confused with dun, especially in minimally brindle animals. For a long time, brindle was considered to be a form of dun.

For a more thorough exploration of brindle, see Sharon Batteatte's Brindle Horse Website

So far, Brindle has evaded breeders' attempts to breed for it.
 

RARE & MISCELLANEOUS: BRINDLE   BROWN   CHROME  CURLIES   WHITE   DUN OR BUCKSKIN?   CHIMERAS AND SOMATIC MUTATIONS

GENETIC OVERVIEW  EQUINE BASE COLORS   DOMINANT GENES   DILUTION GENES   RECESSIVES  

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